Geoffrey Boulton

Geoffrey Boulton

Geoffrey Boulton is a geoscientist who has made considerable contributions to our understanding of glaciers and the ways in which they shaped the landscape over recent geological time. Geoffrey uses a multidisciplinary approach to unearth the secrets of how ancient landforms were created. His current work combines fieldwork in Iceland and Antarctica with laboratory work and mathematical modelling to investigate how present-day glaciers interact with the beds over which they flow, and how these processes determine the behaviour of prehistoric ice sheets and the geological features they left behind. Geoffrey is internationally renowned for his findings and accepted an OBE in 2000 for services to science and higher education. He has also received a number of other awards, including the 2001 Seligman Crystal of the International Glaciological Society, 2006 Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London and 2014 Royal Medal of the Royal Geographical Society. In 2009, he was made Commandeur de l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques by the French government, and he has received honorary degrees from a number of European and UK universities.